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Dante Cicchetti, Ph.D.
Dante Cicchetti Ph.D.
McKnight Presidential Chair, William Harris Professor, Institute of Child Development
University of Minnesota
Through his leadership in research, Dr. Cicchetti has encouraged the field of developmental psychopathology to bridge separations across disciplines and to integrate knowledge bases drawn from normative and atypical development. His work in the area of the causes and consequences of child maltreatment and violence has transformed social policy and provided information on resilience and maladaptation for high-risk children. Through Development and Psychopathology, the journal he founded and edits, he has fostered the publication of stellar empirical research that has applications for normal and atypical populations.
Sheree L. Toth, Ph.D.
Sheree Toth, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Mt. Hope Family Center (MHFC)
Professor of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, University of Rochester
Dr. Toth’s interests are broadly focused in the area of developmental psychopathology. Throughout her career, Dr. Toth has been committed to bridging research and clinical practice and she is committed to promoting greater use of effective services in the community.Consistent with a developmental psychopathology framework, Dr. Toth’s research utilizes a multiple-levels-of-analysis strategy that integrates social, emotional, and psychophysiological processes. As an Associate Editor of Development and Psychopathology and a member of the Child Maltreatment editorial board, she consistently encourages the field to consider the implications of its work for advancing the best interests of individuals struggling with the trauma accompanying maltreatment.
Catherine Cerulli, J.D., Ph.D.
Catherine Cerulli, J.D., Ph.D.
Director, Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization, Director, Susan B. Anthony Center
Professor, Psychiatry, University of Rochester
Since 1983, Dr. Cerulli has worked with survivors of violence in a variety of capacities including as a counselor, advocate, prosecutor, defense attorney, and researcher. Following a T32, she completed a K01 NIMH randomized control trial (RCT) in Family Court, the first known RCT in such a setting with victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). She has also focused her research and intervention studies on suicide, homicide, and recruitment and retention methods among high-risk vulnerable populations using Community-Based Participatory Research principles.
Elizabeth Handley, Ph.D.
Elizabeth Handley, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Mt. Hope Family Center
Assistant Professor, University of Rochester
Dr. Handley’s research is grounded in the developmental psychopathology framework and explores multilevel and transactional risk and protective mechanisms of development among at-risk children and families. She has data analytic expertise with multiple-levels-of analysis directly applicable to child welfare research, including data analysis with epigenetic, genetic, immune, and neuroendocrine data. Dr. Handley also provides quantitative support and consultation to faculty and students in various departments at the University of Rochester.
Corey Nichols-Hadeed, J.D.
Corey Nichols-Hadeed, J.D.
Associate, Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization (LIVV)
Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center
Ms. Nichols-Hadeed’s role in LIVV has primarily focused on exploration of the impact of policy and law on public health outcomes, with a primary focus on safety and injury prevention. The primary goal of this work is to translate what is learned about the impact of policy into actionable practices. Ms. Nichols-Hadeed also has expertise in regulations governing human subject research, conducting research with vulnerable populations in community settings, and coordinating court-based research studies linking victims of intimate partner violence with mental health. This work is centered on the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration and community-based projects.
Kristen Quinlan, Ph.D.
Kristen Quinlan, Ph.D.
Director – Outreach Core, Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention
Education Development Center
Dr. Kristen Quinlan is lead epidemiologist for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, where she provides recommendations on using suicide-related data for planning, quality improvement, and/or impact purposes. Dr. Quinlan is also the Director of the Outreach Core for the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention, where she is responsible for translating the latest suicide prevention research into practice. Dr. Quinlan also coordinates and evaluates webinars and communities of practice for the TRANSFORM project for the prevention of child abuse and neglect.
Jerry Reed, Ph.D.
Jerry Reed, Ph.D.
Senior Vice President for Practice Leadership
Education Development Center
Dr. Jerry Reed serves as Senior Vice President for Practice Leadership at Education Development Center (EDC), where he oversees work on projects such as the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, the Zero Suicide Institute, the Children’s Safety Network, and several violence prevention initiatives. Dr. Reed also serves as Co-Director of the Injury Control Research Center for Suicide Prevention. He recently co-led the committee that updated the U.S. National Strategy for Suicide Prevention and he serves as an Executive Committee member of the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. Dr. Reed also serves on the National Advisory Board of the Kennedy-Satcher Center for Mental Health Parity.
Fred Rogosch, Ph.D.
Fred Rogosch, Ph.D.
Research Director, Mt. Hope Family Center
Associate Professor, University of Rochester
Dr. Rogosch has extensive experience conducting multilevel investigation of complex processes which influence the long-term effects of child maltreatment on allostatic load, epigenetic modifications, and physical and mental health in adulthood. A central theme in his research interests involves the effects of early experience on diverse psychological and biological processes involved in development, psychopathology, and resilience. He has extensive experience with research on other high risk populations, including infants and toddlers of mothers with major depressive disorder and children exposed to parental alcoholism.
Zena Shuber, J.D.
Zena Shuber, J.D.
Associate, Laboratory of Interpersonal Violence and Victimization (LIVV)
Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center
Ms. Shuber’s role at LIVV focuses on translating evidence based research regarding childhood abuse and neglect prevention into transformative practice and policy nationwide through community engagement. Ms. Shuber also has experience comparing and analyzing national laws, policies and standards regarding suicide prevention. Prior to join LIVV, Ms. Shuber worked closely with Congresswoman Louise Slaughter in her District Office as a special projects assistant and community liaison regarding women, children and education issues. She began her career as a Cook County Assistant District Attorney in the Child Support Enforcement Division and as a fellow at the International Institute of Higher Studies in Criminal Sciences, Siracusa, Italy where she focused on International protection of women and children’s rights.
Melissa Sturge-Apple, Ph.D.
Melissa Sturge-Apple, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
University of Rochester
Dr. Melissa Sturge-Apple is Dean of Graduate Studies in Arts, Sciences & Engineering, and a Professor of Developmental Psychology at the University of Rochester. She has established expertise in advancing knowledge of our understanding of parenting within the family context and implications for child development broadly, with a particular emphasis on parenting at risk. At a substantive level, her work has advanced how different theoretical formulations may inform understanding of the determinants of aberrations in parenting within stressful ecologies including family systems theory, stress system functioning, self-regulation frameworks, and attachment theory.
Jody Todd Manly, Ph.D.
Jody Todd Manly, Ph.D.
Clinical Director, Mt. Hope Family Center
Sr. Research Associate, Clinical Director & Assistant Professor, University of Rochester
Dr. Todd Manly has served in Principal Investigator, Co-Investigator, Evaluator, and Project Director roles on several federally-funded research projects involving the linkages among child maltreatment, domestic violence, poverty, and community violence with preschool and school-aged children as well as adolescents. As Clinical Director at the Mt. Hope Family Center, she has coordinated the implementation of evidence-based treatment models and evaluation of these models in treatment evaluation research. She has conducted numerous trainings on the impact of trauma on children’s development and on implementation of evidence-based trauma treatment for children at high risk for abuse and neglect.